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20121211
20121211
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
, michigan. massive crowds gathering at the state capitol. they're protesting the state's right to work law. the lawmakers set to cast the final votes inside that building this morning. we understand the governor is very ready to sign that into law. very controversial situation going on live in lansing. good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum. you are here in america's nice room. >> i'm gregg jarrett in for bill gregg: the right to work vote will mean unions will no longer force workers to pay dues. that the birthplace of the powerful united auto workers union. martha: this has huge national implications over the power of organized labor. governor rick snyder believes there will be more job. he believes the protests hurt more than they help. here he is. >> if you go forward you will create a environment involving labor issues this could rise to the lebl level where i might not keep it off my agenda. i'm not happy about being in this situation. >> he has the responsibility as our leader avoiding this kind of a cliff. it is not, it is not good enough to be for him to say liks behind us.
point, bracing for protests. thousands battling over michigan's right to work. will the governor reconsider the controversial measure. >>> and president obama and house speaker boehner mum on fiscal cliff negotiations. and a sign that a deal could be near. >>> new world order, the economy growing at an enormous rate in china, and in a few years it will surpass the u.s. what it means, coming up. >>> dozens of homes damaged in the south, ripping off roofs and damaging trees. more to come. stamp watch, straight ahead. >>> lots to talk about this morning. the next two hours, we'll talk with steve israel. jeff sessions, sandy levin, rahm emanuel and businessman javier paolomarez, ed burns, frankie monday easy, and chuck leavell. "starting point" begins right now. welcome, everybody. "starting point" this morning, angry, united. bracing for protests in michigan as the state is poised to become the most unionized right to work state. as many as 10,000 unionized workers expected at the state capitol to voice their disapproval of the measure. some of them teachers, two detroit area school
it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> welcome back. >>> michigan is poised to become the most unionized right to work state. workers are expected to voice their disapproval today at the state capital. even president obama stepping into the fray during a visit yesterday to a daimler truck factory in redford, michigan. >> these so-called right to work laws, they don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they're really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. >> alison kosik is in lancing with the latest for us. if we could take this to the 101 level here. explain right to work. >> it essentially means if this law passes, the right to work law, even it passes here in michigan, it means if you are looking for work in michigan you wouldn't be forced to pay union dues 0 are join a union as a condition to get a job or keep a job. for a state like michigan which was built on unions, it really is a huge sea of change here. and it comes with an element of symbolism as well. especially since unions are so engrained in this state.
. the president flew to michigan where he blasted the republican-led state legislature and the republican governor for their support of right-to-work legislation. his timing could hardly have been worse. that worker rights legislation will be voted on and given final approval tomorrow and be signed into law by governor rick snyder. michigan becomes the 24th state in the nation to ratify a aw that protects workers from being forced to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. we'll be examining tonight what's happening in michigan and in washington, d.c. with the author of "shadow bosses: how government. employee unions control america and rob taxpayers blind." mallory factor joins us. also tonight, egypt's president, muhammad morsi, ordering the egyptian military to arrest people in the street even as he claimed to have rescinded the dictatorial powers he assumed which have spurred violent demonstrations. and a new intelligence report concludes that america's time as the lone superpower is nearing an end. former director of national intelligence john negro panty joins us to talk about ou
, smaller business owners. the 10 to go after people from flint, michigan, not so, in tennessee. by a large we're talking to smaller investors, entrepreneurs, business owners. host: what are the members concerns with the fiscal cliff stocks? -- talks? guest: for most small-business owners and senior executives at big companies, the fear is that going over the cliff, even on a technical term, will increase their borrowing costs and will put our economic recovery at risk. most business leaders point to simpson-bowles. they understand that we have to raise revenue and we also have to control spending. they generally like the outlines of the simpson-bowles deal, the principles behind it. spread the cost, protect the most vulnerable, don't disrupt the economic recovery, try to simplify the tax code. they generally support those principles. host: do they believe a recession could happen if we fall off the so called "fiscal cliff?" guest: they do. what we saw last year is business leaders were concerned that washington was not going to come together with a deal. and that it could end badly, but it
states of michigan and missouri in the procurement. and as a result of that procurement, a new manufacturer that is chosen to locate in the state of illinois, because governor quinn actually aggressively went after that manufacture before it was even known that they would be building any rail cars for this initiative, nepa located their facility in rochelle illinois and have higher 250 people and that is from nothing. we weren't competing with other states. those jobs are new jobs to the united states, new jobs to illinois. so that's cleared a success story. that facility also is making some transit cars for metro which is suburban chicago fixed rail system for commuters. so that is a big success story. and i think i talked briefly about normal illinois. my comments, normal illinois is home to illinois state university, and that in illinois is the station with the second highest ridership, second only to chicago. and that's because they have built this wonderful station to they use tiger funds to build the station. that is a station that connects the riders getting off of the t
cliff. the next day the president jetted off to michigan to campaign for tax increases instead of staying in washington to work on a possible plan. with a national debt of over $16 trillion, washington's out-of-control spending is placing our national security at risk. clearly spending is a threat with an increase of 93.5% over 10 years and revenues increased only 15.7%. raising taxes on the american economy will destroy jobs. reports have indicated that raising taxes on the top 2% will generate up to $80 billion a year. this amount of money covers less than 10% of our nation's annual deficits. it's my hope that the president will address the fiscal cliff to work with house republicans to promote small business job growth. in conclusion, god bless our troops and we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. dold: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. dold: th
, it's a large manufacturing state. we've got a big obstacle in the way with lake michigan to get product to the east coast. so i recognize there's need for investment. but i often hear from my constituents the concern of the government, of the federal government picking regions of the country to win and lose in the economic battles that take place between states. in other words, if we invest a lot of money in the northeast quarter's federal taxpayer or a lot of money in california, the fax payer in -- taxpayer in wisconsin is wondering are we just making those states more competitive to compete against wisconsin manufacturing? could you talk a little bit about how the whole thing plays together and what the answer should be? >> first of all, i know you know this, but you all were in the ball game. >> yeah. i'm not making the statement on -- >> i know you're not. i'm saying if you feel your state is disadvantaged, it's not because of us. we wanted to make investments, we were ready to make investments. >> let's take it from montana. let's just take it from a different region becau
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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